Family Stories and Tweens

by Jim Halcomb

One interesting way for tweens to interact with older relatives — grandparents, fathers, mothers, aunts and uncles — is to have them ask family members about their lives in order to preserve their stories. Kids can do this through interviewing their relatives and writing down the stories, taking a home video of their relatives or even making a scrapbook page about the stories. Not only will children learn more about their family's history, they will grow closer to their extended family. If you don't live near older relatives, consider having your child call them on the phone or use Skype. Doing this will help tweens learn to sit, listen and talk to older people. And it can be done all year.

Want more ideas to help your children become interested and involved in the lives of their elderly relatives? Read these related articles:

Finding Faith in the Family Tree

Building Memories

Valuing the Elderly

When I Was 10

Right-Now Love


Copyright © 2012 by Jim Halcomb. Used by permission. ThrivingFamily.com.

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