Thinking About Others

by Becky Tidberg

To encourage my kids to ask about others rather than striving to be the center of attention, my husband and I started a contest at dinner to see who could remember to ask about someone else's day first. Being the first to ask earned a point. Toward the end of the meal, my husband or I would ask questions to determine if the kids were paying attention, such as, "What was your sister's science project?" or "Where did Mom find strawberries?" Being able to answer a question or two at the end of the meal earned additional points. Then, at the end of the week, whoever had the most points picked a Friday night dessert that everyone was able to enjoy. This activity has made a difference in the kids' interactions beyond the dinner table. Now when I see my son after school, generally the first words out of his mouth are, "How was your day?"


This article appeared in the December 2015/January 2016 issue of Thriving Family magazine. Copyright © 2015 by Becky Tidberg. Used by permission. ThrivingFamily.com.


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